Geographical
and gender distribution

Geographical and gender distribution

Staff working at the PTS are recruited from a broad geographical representation with a view to ensuring the highest standards of professional expertise, experience, efficiency, competency and integrity. Increasingly, the PTS has begun to seek a higher representation of qualified women. This aim reflects a number of decisions made by the Commission starting in April 1998 and including decisions made at the Commission’s 22nd, 23rd and 24th sessions.  

Staff working at the PTS are recruited from all over the world to ensure the highest standards of professional expertise, experience, efficiency, competency and integrity. They are usually multilingual.

Achieving fair geographical distribution

The PTS is committed to ensuring a wide and well-balanced geographical distribution of posts.

The PTS is committed to ensuring a wide and well-balanced geographical distribution of posts as mandated by Article II, paragraph 50, of the Treaty, especially for candidates from Member States that are under-represented or altogether unrepresented at the PTS.

 

A few hindrances that have been encountered in implementing this goal arise with respect to recruiting in technical and scientific areas. In order to counter this, the PTS has begun to send out vacancy announcements and hold interviews via video conference. This allows for a wider outreach to identify qualified candidates where distance and extensive travel would otherwise be an issue.

The PTS is striving for equal participation of both men and women in the organization, especially at the professional and managerial levels.

The PTS has also—in collaboration with scientific and technical institutions, as well as with the UN and other international agencies present in these places—more widely disseminated information on vacancy notices. Lastly, donor countries now offer the possibility to finance the expenses of qualified candidates, especially those from developing countries, for a Junior Professional Officers (JPO) programme.

Targeting a fairer gender distribution

The PTS is striving for equal participation of both men and women in the organization, especially at the professional and managerial levels. The March 2013 statistics show that, overall, 41% of women compared to 59% of men work at the PTS. In the professional category, 32% of professionals are women as opposed to 68% who are men. Women are more prevalent in the General Service category – 60% as opposed to 40% who are men.

The PTS is working hard to increase the number of women at the professional level, especially in the scientific and technical categories.

The main obstacle to the recruitment of qualified women seems to be the very specialized technical expertise required by the CTBTO. This background—especially in the physical sciences (i.e. nuclear engineering, nuclear physics/chemistry, geophysics, hydroacoustic physics, atmospheric science/physics, etc.)—is less often found amongst female applicants.

The PTS has thus introduced various measures, including giving preference to well-qualified women candidates in the recruitment process, to ensure that in cases of equal qualifications and suitability, women are chosen over men. All vacancy announcements clearly state this.

Recruiting women at the CTBTO cont.

Measures have also been taken to reach out to more well-qualified female applicants through States Signatories. The PTS has involved States themselves to assist in targeting promising female candidates. In addition, the PTS sends vacancy announcements to the technical points of contact of various National Data Centres (NDCs), to United Nations offices and duty stations in various countries, as well as to countries’ Permanent Missions in Vienna. These are then sent to Foreign Ministries and other national authorities to be placed in local newspapers and on appropriate websites, as well as in universities, scientific and technical institutions. 

Downtown Vienna

There are ever more incentives for well-qualified women aspiring to work at the PTS. One of them is the host city of Vienna, which is known to be both safe and entertaining, abounding with a high level of culture and natural beauty. Secondly, the PTS’s offices are located at the Vienna International Centre and supported by an environment that aims to be family-friendly. For example, a child care facility is available on the premises with opening hours compatible with PTS working hours.

The PTS supports fair gender distribution in the organization and aims to increase the employment of women both in professional and managerial positions, as well as in the technical areas.

In addition, the PTS supports “flextime” or flexible working hours, which allow staff to plan a more convenient working day. Part-time work may also be available under certain circumstances for both GS and P-level staff. Women are entitled to a fully-paid four month maternity leave. Finally, for their protection, a policy for the prevention of sexual harassment and other forms of unfair or discriminatory behaviour is in place.

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