About


The 20 Years CTBT Ministerial Meeting brought together leaders and policymakers to discuss, review, and reinvigorate the discussion on the CTBT. By providing a venue for participants to voice their needs, security concerns, and demands, the Ministerial Meeting stimulated the discussion needed on the issues currently blocking the entry into force of the worldwide ban on nuclear explosions.

This year represents an opportune moment to engage in these discussions. Marking 20 years after the Treaty opened for signature, the eight remaining Annex 2 countries that have still to ratify the Treaty were invited to join Member States and the CTBTO to discuss what is required to turn the global moratorium on nuclear testing from de facto into de jure.

Other events held on the sidelines of the Ministerial Meeting included a civil society panel entitled “CTBT@20: The Way Forward - The role of Civil Society” and the opening of the CTBT@20 exhibition.

The High Level Ministerial Meeting started on 13 June 2016, at the Vienna International Centre, Vienna, Austria - see first day summary.

 

LET'S FINISH WHAT WE STARTED.

Civil Society Panel

Monday, 13 June 2016, 15:00 - 17:00
The panel CTBT@20: The Way Forward - The role of Civil Society brought together world-renowned experts in nuclear non-proliferation & disarmament and the next generation of nuclear specialists.

Meeting Details


Programme
  (PDF Version)

Statements

Media

Media advisory - issued 6 June 2016

Group of Eminent Persons

CTBTO Youth Group Report for the CTBT 20th Anniversary

Digital/Online Version (PDF)
Print Version (Single Pages) (PDF)

Exhibition

Throughout June, the Vienna International Centre’s Rotunda will host a large exhibition on the CTBT and its organization. Exhibits include on-site inspection equipment not made available to the public before; artworks and photography inspired by the issue of nuclear testing from China, Kazakhstan and other countries as well as the 360 ̊ virtual reality film installation “Collisions” (13-16 June) starring an Australian indigenous elder who experienced nuclear testing in his homelands. (Flyer - PDF)